ATEC Professor to Present as Part of CentralTrak Next Topic Series

‘NEXT TOPIC’ returns for the fall season with a series of illuminating events kicked off by two in-depth conversations on creative computation and techniques by which artists can enhance their expression through computer science and engineering.

Presenting Lecturers

Paul Fishwick
‘Creative Automata’
There was a time when artists and computer scientists were one. This was a time dominated by the creation of automata made of metal and wood, and extravagantly crafted. With relatively new computing technology, we revisit this mode of “coding” and “computing” through immersive games such as Minecraft and maker-culture with micro controllers and 3D printing.
The session will be followed by Q&A with the audience.

 

 


Ira GreenbergIra Greenberg
‘Making Code Drip’

Trained as a painter, I explored the visual world studying rhythm, pattern. color, form and the problem of discretely recording this infinite data onto a static, flat, finite surface. Over time the motif and resultant “painting/data” transitioned from landscape, to tree, to foliage, to pure marks and patterned color fields. At some point I realized I was painting algorithms, which coincided with a growing interest in computer graphics. It also slowly dawned on me that if I could learn to master “computation” as a craft oriented medium, I could essentially create multi-dimensional worlds, paintings that moved, evolved and ultimately emerged–perhaps even not completely under my own explicit control. This transition in my work–from paint to code–occurred approximately 15 years ago. My work today, looking in from the outside, can be misconstrued as computer science research; it’s not. I’m not sure if it’s “Art” either. However, it’s work I continue to be intrigued by.

‘NEXT TOPIC’ is a monthly lecture series at CentralTrak Artists’ Residency and Gallery which aims to foster critical discussions on contemporary art issues among Dallas artists, thinkers, critics, educators, theorist, and shapers across DFW area. These events are free and open to the public.

For questions, suggestions or ideas about our future sessions, please email NEXT TOPIC
Program Chair Mona Kasra at mona.kasra@utdallas.edu.

CentralTrak, The University of Texas at Dallas Artists Residency, established in 2008, is dedicated to the creation, presentation, and advancement of the contemporary arts. As a live/work space for eight artists, it serves as a community center in the North Texas area for broad intellectual discourse around the arts. While the residency promotes artistic experimentation through its support of production, the companion gallery encourages critical engagement in a local urban context through exhibitions and related programs. By building on the forward-thinking academic resources of the School of Arts & Humanities at The University of Texas at Dallas, CentralTrak unites artists from an expansive range of creative disciplines to extend and challenge contemporary notions of artistic practice, creative expression, and the role technology plays in these processes. CentralTrak is supported in part by the generosity of numerous donors and partners from the North Texas area and The University of Texas at Dallas.

CentralTrak
Address: 800 Exposition, Dallas, TX 75226
Hours: Saturday 12:00 – 5:00 during exhibitions, tours available by appointment call (469) 232-7298.
Admission: Free
Visit the CentralTrak website for more information

ATEC Professor Receives Grant for Social Media Mashup

Scot Gresham-Lancaster
Scot Gresham-Lancaster

Scot Gresham-Lancaster (Associate Professor of Sound Design in the UT Dallas Arts and Technology program) has been awarded a major NEA grant via the New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA) and turbulence.org for a social media mashup that uses the dynamic input of users to continuously rewrite some sonnets of William Shakespeare. To view the page the user must phonetically rhyme a word or short phrase. For example: “unhappily forsworn” can be rhymed as “so snappily untorn” or  “captain” becomes “napkin” etc. These rhymes, that are offered by users dynamically, replace the original text of the sonnet. Prosody is maintained, but meaning is transformed.

 

When the entire sonnet is replaced with user text the process continues to recursively generate and replace with the most recent rhyming. These would be rhymings of rhymings. An english accented text to speech program will be run to hear the new variation. A computer synthesizer with algorithmic variations of Lachrimae, or Seven Tears by John Dowland will be playing with timbre changes based on the statistical letter use in the new rhyming of the sonnet. The more the statistical variation the greater the musical change. The user can choose to hear the voice and/or the Dowland variation playback or just read the “perturbed sonnet”.

 

This piece will be realized in conjunction with ATEC graduate students to allow them to participate in an internet project of international scope and practice, and will be available for public use in April of 2014.

 

Advanced Topics in Communication (COMM 3342) Topic Changes

EMAC 4372 isn’t the only place you’ll find schedule changes this fall. We also had to switch up our plans for the COMM 3342 courses.

In COMM 3342.001, Carie Lambert will focus on Communication Ethics as the class covers topics such as intercultural communication, professional codes of ethics, whistleblowing, alternative online identities, fanfiction, hacking, and intellectual property. Course textbooks are available at the campus bookstore if you want to order them early.

In COMM 3342.501, Deanna McKinley will share Public Relations Principles with students. McKinley is the Vice-President for Multicultural Communications at OCG PR in Fort Worth, a public relations firm that focuses on diverse multicultural market segments. If you take this course, you will practice implementing PR strategies across different media to capture audience attention and use the AP style that many social media positions require. Her course textbooks are available at the campus bookstore and at Off-Campus Books.

Seats are available in each section. The courses satisfy EMAC degree plan requirements, but they are open to all majors.

A Tale of Two 4372s in Fall 2013

Back in the Spring we posted information about the two sections of EMAC 4372 that are being offered in Fall 2013. There have been some schedule changes and those courses are now being taught by different faculty.

 

YouTube

EMAC 4372.001 is now being taught by Barbara Vance and will address the topic “The YouTube: The History, The Culture, The Creators.”

 

 

“electronic led light dress at the museum of science and industry in chicago” by Flickr user David Hilowitz
“electronic led light dress at the museum of science and industry in chicago” by Flickr user David Hilowitz

EMAC 4372.002 is now being taught by Kim Knight and is the first formal course offering around her research and public Humanities project, Fashioning Circuits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is still room in both classes. The course descriptions are:

EMAC 4372.001 “The YouTube:  The History, The Culture, The Creators” with Barbara Vance:

What started as a few video diaries has become the largest search engine in the world.  YouTube is now home to university lectures, television shows, movies, online-created shows, music videos…the list goes on.  This course is a combination of history, theory and workshop.  We will study the rise of YouTube, how it has morphed over the years, and how youtube is changing culture, art, science, and education—to name a few.  Students will study the current youtube culture and how to build a youtube channel.  All students will be required to create a public youtube channel, which they will build upon over the course of the semester.  This is not a course on how to use film or edit—it is a practicum on how to build and sustain a solid youtube channel and an understanding of the platform.

EMAC 4372.002 “Fashioning Circuits” with Kim Knight:

Fashion and emerging media have more in common than one might think. Both are constantly in flux and looking forward. Both are sites to negotiate and express identity. Both value originality, but also thrive on collaboration and appropriation. The two are explicitly combined in the realm of wearable media, which will be the main focus of this course. We will begin with a brief look at the history of fashion and its historical intersections with media and technology. We will then explore more contemporary areas of intersection centered on issues of identity and globalization. The final portion of the semester will be devoted to “learning by doing” in the production of socially-engaged and critically-informed wearable media projects. No sewing, electronics, or coding experience is necessary.

In this course, students will:

Become familiar with the basic social and ethical issues that connect fashion and emerging media.

Write critical analysis of fashion and media theories and practices.

Become familiar with the basic concepts of electronic circuitry, wearable arduino hardware, and the arduino programming language.

Produce two wearable media objects. No prior sewing, electronics, or coding experience required.

A Tale of Two 4372s in Fall 2013

Back in the Spring we posted information about the two sections of EMAC 4372 that are being offered in Fall 2013. There have been some schedule changes and those courses are now being taught by different faculty.

 

YouTube

EMAC 4372.001 is now being taught by Barbara Vance and will address the topic “The YouTube: The History, The Culture, The Creators.”

 

 

“electronic led light dress at the museum of science and industry in chicago” by Flickr user David Hilowitz
“electronic led light dress at the museum of science and industry in chicago” by Flickr user David Hilowitz

EMAC 4372.002 is now being taught by Kim Knight and is the first formal course offering around her research and public Humanities project, Fashioning Circuits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is still room in both classes. The course descriptions are:

EMAC 4372.001 “The YouTube:  The History, The Culture, The Creators” with Barbara Vance:

What started as a few video diaries has become the largest search engine in the world.  YouTube is now home to university lectures, television shows, movies, online-created shows, music videos…the list goes on.  This course is a combination of history, theory and workshop.  We will study the rise of YouTube, how it has morphed over the years, and how youtube is changing culture, art, science, and education—to name a few.  Students will study the current youtube culture and how to build a youtube channel.  All students will be required to create a public youtube channel, which they will build upon over the course of the semester.  This is not a course on how to use film or edit—it is a practicum on how to build and sustain a solid youtube channel and an understanding of the platform.

EMAC 4372.002 “Fashioning Circuits” with Kim Knight:

Fashion and emerging media have more in common than one might think. Both are constantly in flux and looking forward. Both are sites to negotiate and express identity. Both value originality, but also thrive on collaboration and appropriation. The two are explicitly combined in the realm of wearable media, which will be the main focus of this course. We will begin with a brief look at the history of fashion and its historical intersections with media and technology. We will then explore more contemporary areas of intersection centered on issues of identity and globalization. The final portion of the semester will be devoted to “learning by doing” in the production of socially-engaged and critically-informed wearable media projects. No sewing, electronics, or coding experience is necessary.

In this course, students will:

Become familiar with the basic social and ethical issues that connect fashion and emerging media.

Write critical analysis of fashion and media theories and practices.

Become familiar with the basic concepts of electronic circuitry, wearable arduino hardware, and the arduino programming language.

Produce two wearable media objects. No prior sewing, electronics, or coding experience required.

ATEC Course to Explore Crowd Funding

What do a pool being built in the middle of a New York City river, Veronica Mars and a hoodie guaranteed to last 10 years all have in common? They were all made possible via a popular crowd funding platform called Kickstarter, a website that lets creatives reach out directly to the public and raise funding for projects that would otherwise most likely never see the light of day.

In ATEC 6384.501 we will spend the semester exploring the ins and outs of crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo. The course will also be discussing the impacts that crowdfunding has had on various industries including videogames and film, and look at what the future might hold for this wildly popular movement.

With some luck, and a lot of hard work, see your own ideas get funded when we kickstart some projects in class to learn first hand what it’s like to be a part of the movement.

If you have any questions or would like more information please contact the course instructor Jacob Naasz at jcn042000@utdallas.edu