Announcing STEM to STEAM graduate seminar for Fall 2016, ATEC UT Dallas.

ATEC 6380. 501 STEM to STEAM.

Contact roger.malina@utdallas.edu for info and approval to enroll.

urlFall 2016 Instructor: Professor Roger Malina. Classes will be held on Monday Evenings.

This seminar will be co-taught with modules led by Dr. Paul Fishwick, Dr. Eun Ah Lee and Professor Kathryn Evans.

Course description: The seminar is open to PhD, MA and MFA students. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum).

Syllabus is designed around the research or creative projects of each student.

This course will study current and emerging topics, approaches, and practices, where arts, sciences, and humanities interact or converge, with the goal to advance new research questions and areas of inquiry.

The integration of the arts, humanities and design into Science, Technology, Engineering and Math has become an important research and education agenda in the US and internationally. In this seminar each student will work with the instructor and/or other students on topics in science and engineering that are part of their ATEC or EMAC PhD, MA or MFA project of interest.

The syllabus will be modified to discuss topic areas of each student. Deliverables from each student for the seminar will be defined individually so that each student makes significant progress on their own project. TOPICS Guest lecturers will include visitors to ATEC and also online guests proposed by the students. Topics and readings will include the following topics, with others to be added responding to student areas of interest: The ethics of curiosity, Readings from the work of Indian philosopher of science Sundar Sarukkai, Foundations of inter and transdisciplinary research with readings from the work of Allen Repko, The science of collaboration, readings around the methodologies used to develop successful collaboration strategies when the work bridges the arts, sciences and humanities, Key readings from the Science of Team science initiative, anthropologist James Leach and other experts on training collaboration techniques.

Required reading will be the NSF funded study led by Dr. Malina on enabling new forms of collaboration between the arts and humanities with science and engineering. How researchers and artists can use developing techniques in cultural analytics, data visualization and representation, data Science. How digital humanities are enabling new research questions and methods. Data immersion and exploration. Performing data. Contemporary initiatives in cognitive sciences and neurobiology that can inform research and creative practices. Innovations in scholarly and art publishing and education. How researchers and artists document their work and present to different audiences today. The history and current practices of inter, multi and transdisciplinary research including recent work on the second wave of “consilience’ or emerging practices to succeed in ‘vertical integration’ of the sciences/engineering with arts/design/humanities. Research in arts and design.

We will look at how international programs are developing research methodologies in arts and design and emerging best practices. Development of rationales for art-science and art-technology in society in the USA and Europe. History and trends in design education. Creative industries today. Citizen science, collaborative science and open science developments today.

Deliverables Students will be expected to use social media and new forms of professional documentation such as video abstracts, podcasts, an online research web site or blog. Each student will record a podcast discussing their work to be published on the Leonardo Creative Disturbance podcast platform at MIT Press. Strategies for public engagement. Funding is available for student presentations at local events and conferences. Students who wish to enroll are encouraged to contact the instructor at roger.malina@utdallas.edu. So that, the syllabus can be augmented in areas of specific interest or need of the student.

Grading will be based 10% on attendance, 45% on participation and presentations made during the semester and 45% on the final deliverable. The final deliverable for the end of the semester is intended to help each student work and advance their ATEC or EMAC PhD, MA or MFA project or interest. Format of the deliverable will be determined by the student in consultation with the instructor.

ATEC Professor Named Recipient of UT System’s 2016 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award.

Dr. Kim Knight, assistant professor in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication and Dr. John McClain Watson of Naveen Jindal School of Management – UT Dallas have been named recipients of the University of Texas System‘s 2016 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award.

medal-teachingEstablished by the Board of Regents in 2008, the Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards complement a wide range of System-wide efforts that underscore the Board’s commitment to ensuring the UT System is a place of intellectual exploration and discovery, educational excellence and unparalleled opportunity.

The awards – each accompanied by $25,000 – are offered annually in recognition of faculty members at the nine academic and six health institutions in the UT System who have demonstrated extraordinary classroom performance and dedication to innovation.

ROTA candidates are vetted by peer faculty, students and campus presidents at their own institutions before advancing to competition at the System level. A selection committee of distinguished educators within and outside the UT System considers a range of criteria, including classroom expertise, curricula quality, innovative course development and student learning outcomes.

13432275_10153778391942476_4871653258190314430_nKim Knight is an Assistant Professor of Emerging Media and Communication at the University of Texas at Dallas. Her research broadly centers on the ways digital culture affects negotiations of power and the formation of identity. More specifically, her current work on viral media addresses the role of digital media as it circulates outside of broadcast paradigms and empowers or oppresses subjects in network society. She also has multiple research projects in progress on the topic of gendered identity and digital media. One of the fundamental strategies of her research methodology is to bring together the vectors of theory and practice. As such, her work uniquely blends traditional modes of scholarship with the production of theoretically-informed media objects.

Kim teaches classes in digital media theory, the shift from analog to digital textuality, viral media, wearable media, and race, class, gender, and sexuality in digital environments. Her classes center on the same hybrid approach of theorizing and making that underlies her research.

Kim writes and is editor-in-chief for the blog The Spiral Dance (http://thespiraldance.wordpress.com). The title is taken from the closing line of Donna Haraway’s influential essay “Manifesto for Cyborgs” and the blog critically addresses the intersections of media, technology, and gendered identity. In addition, she is the project leader, site administrator, and editor of Fashioning Circuits (http://fashioningcircuits.com), a research blog and public humanities project that addresses the social and cultural implications of the intersection between fashion and technology. In addition, the Fashioning Circuits project works with community partners to develop programming to introduce non-programmers to coding and making in a Humanities context. A book on Fashioning Circuits is under contract and forthcoming in 2016.

Kim is active in university and public service and is regularly invited to give talks on women and technology, social and wearable media, and Digital Humanities.