Art History Institute’s Ad Astra Lecture Begins Spring Slate of Events

Two talks this week will kick off the spring semester’s arts events.

On Wednesday, Dr. Sean B. Carroll, vice president for science education of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, will chronicle the adventures of scientist Jacques Monod in a talk presented by UT Dallas’ Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History as part of the Ad Astra Lecture Series.

Sean B. Carroll will talk about scientist Jacques Monod on Wednesday in a lecture presented by the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at UT Dallas. Carroll wrote about Monod in his book Brave Genius: A Scientist, A Philosopher and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize. The lecture will be held at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Named after the Latin phrase ad astra, meaning “to the stars,” the lecture series hosts emerging and established practitioners from art, science and technology with a goal of expanding the world and practice of the discipline of art history.

Carroll, an award-winning scientist, writer, educator and film producer, described Monod’s emergence as a public figure and leading voice of science in the book Brave Genius: A Scientist, A Philosopher and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize.

Carroll’s other books include Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species, which was a finalist for the National Book Award for nonfiction; The Making of the Fittest; andEndless Forms Most Beautiful. He also wrote a regular feature, “Remarkable Creatures,” for The New York Times.

The lecture is at 7 p.m. in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art. Admission is free and open to the public.

On Thursday, UT Dallas will host a panel discussion with distinguished figures in contemporary art and art education.

The discussion, titled “Panel Discussion on The Art Effect: Translational Ecology of Contemporary Art,” comes in conjunction with the Loris Gréaud exhibition that opens Saturday at the Dallas Contemporary. The forum aims to achieve an “intellectual investigation of translation, postproduction and relations in the context of contemporary art.”

The discussion will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building main lobby.

The panelists are:

  • Nicolas Bourriaud, director of the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-arts in Paris, curator, art critic and theorist. Bourriaud was curator for contemporary art at the Tate Britain in London from 2007 to 2010.
  • Éric Mangion, director of the National Centre of Contemporary Art of the Villa Arson in Nice, France, since 2006.
  • Loris Gréaud, transdisciplinary artist based in Paris. Gréaud creates transformative experiences that challenge the senses and confront the viewer with otherworldly landscapes.
  • Frank Dufour (moderator) digital artist, director of graduate studies for the ATEC program
  • Justine Ludwig, senior curator, Dallas Contemporary
  • Noah Simblist, associate professor and chair of the Division of Art, Southern Methodist University
  • Charissa Terranova, associate professor of aesthetic studies, UT Dallas

The event, supported by the Cultural Service at the French Consulate in Houston, is free and open to the public.

Panel Discussion on The Art Effect: Translational Ecology of Contemporary Art

Dallas ContemporaryIn conjunction with the Loris Gréaud exhibition at the Dallas Contemporary opening Jan. 17, The Arts & Technology program and The Center for Translation Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas are hosting a panel discussion with local and international distinguished figures in contemporary art and art education. The objective of this forum is the intellectual investigation of translation, postproduction and relations in the context of contemporary art.

The panel discussion will take place on Thursday, Jan. 15 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology building main lobby.

PANEL

Nicolas Bourriaud

Nicolas Bourriaud
Nicolas Bourriaud

Nicolas is currently Director of the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-arts in Paris, cu- rator, art critic and theorist. From 2007 to 2010, Bourriaud was curator for contemporary art at The Tate Britain in London, where he organized, Altermodern.

From 1999 to 2006, he was also curator of contemporary art and co-director of Palais de Tokyo. Commissioner of Biennales in Lyons, Moscow and Athens (2005-2011) Bourriaud has curated numerous exhibitions worldwide. He is the founder of the art journals Documents sur l’Art and Revue Perpendiculaire and is a published author whose essays Relational Aesthetics, Postproduc- tion and The Radicant have been translated into fifteen languages.

Éric Mangion

Éric Mangion
Éric Mangion

Eric Mangion has been Director of the National Centre of Contemporary Art of the Villa Arson in Nice, France since 2006, where he programmed an exhibition cycle conceived from ephemeral practices (sound, poetry or performance). From 1993 to 2005 he directed the FRAC Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur.

He is an active art critic writing for an array of venues, including Art Press, Mangion investigates the function of “disappearance” as an artistic gesture, whether it be a matter of concealment, covering up, destruction, theft, vandalism, or simply the disappearance of the artist, thus analyzing how disappearance accompanies theoretically and formally the creation of our time.

Loris Gréaud

Loris Gréaud
Loris Gréaud

Loris Gréaud is a transdisciplinary artist based in Paris, France. Gréaud creates transformative experiences that challenge the senses and confront the viewer with otherworldly landscapes. Gréaud is the first artist to use the entire space of the Palais de Tokyo for an exhibition titled, “Cellar Doors,” while concurrently showing performative works titled “[I]” in the Louvre and and in the Centre Pompidou.

Free Crowd-funding Workshop Offered Friday, April 4

Crowd Funding FlyerThe Arts and Technology Program (ATEC) and the Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (IIE) are hosting a ½ day program on crowdfunding from 11:00-3:00 on April 4th.   The purpose of the event is to promote awareness of this topic across campus and to bring together students and faculty who have interest.   Please mark your calendars!

WHO: UT Dallas students, faculty, and staff

WHAT:  Half-day workshop on crowdfunding and crowdsourcing including:

  • Overview and trends
  • Company presentations
  • Overview of what other universities are doing
  • Latest developments on equity crowdfunding resulting from the JOBS Act

WHEN:  April 4, 2014, 11-3:00 PM (Come and go as you please)

WHERE:  UTD Faculty Dining Room (adjacent to the UT Dallas cafeteria)

COST:  Free!  Refreshments provided.  Bring your own lunch or plan to eat in the cafeteria that day.

 

RSVP Requested:

https://ezpay.utdallas.edu/C20239_ustores/web/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=1282

 

‘A Father of the Internet’ to Discuss His Role in Developing Technology

Vinton G. Cerf, vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, is the third lecturer in the Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.
Vinton G. Cerf, vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, is the third lecturer in the Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Weeks after the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web, one of the “fathers of the Internet” will visit campus to talk about his role in developing new technology.

Vinton G. Cerf will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 26 as part of the University’s new ATEC Distinguished Lecture Series.

Cerf is vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, and has received such honors as the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his role in the creation of the Internet. In his role at Google, Cerf identifies and promotes new technologies used to develop Internet-based products and services. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Stanford University, and a master’s and PhD in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Cerf is the third of four speakers in the series.

Christian Belady, general manager of Datacenter Services for Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services and a UT Dallas alumnus, spoke Feb. 26. Robert Edsel, writer of the acclaimed book The Monuments Men, kicked off the lecture series to a sold-out audience on Jan. 22.

Get TicketsTickets are $15 for seats on the lower level of the lecture hall; $10 upper level tickets are sold out for Cerf’s lecture. A limited number of complimentary tickets are available for students, faculty and staff who register.

Parking

Guests should park in Parking Structure I.  A map can be found here.

Next in the Series

April 16: Mae Jemison, scientist and astronaut. Click here for tickets.

The fourth speaker will be Dr. Mae Jemison, a chemical engineer, scientist, physician, entrepreneur, teacher and astronaut. She will speak on April 16. Jemison graduated from Stanford University in 1977 and earned her medical degree from Cornell Medical College (now Weill Medical College of Cornell University) in 1981. Jemison, who flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor in 1992, is multilingual and trained in dance and choreography. Jemison is an advocate for science education.

Tickets are on sale now for both remaining lectures. They are $15 for seats on the lower level of the Edith O’Donnell ATEC Building’s lecture hall and $10 for the upper level ($10 tickets are sold out for the Cerf lecture). A limited number of complimentary tickets are available for students, faculty and staff who register.

The lecture series, presented by The Dallas Morning News, was first announced during the recent dedication of the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building. The new building houses programs that explore topics at the intersection of arts and technology.

‘A Father of the Internet’ to Discuss His Role in Developing Technology

Vinton G. Cerf, vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, is the third lecturer in the Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.
Vinton G. Cerf, vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, is the third lecturer in the Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Weeks after the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web, one of the “fathers of the Internet” will visit campus to talk about his role in developing new technology.

Vinton G. Cerf will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 26 as part of the University’s new ATEC Distinguished Lecture Series.

Cerf is vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, and has received such honors as the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his role in the creation of the Internet. In his role at Google, Cerf identifies and promotes new technologies used to develop Internet-based products and services. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Stanford University, and a master’s and PhD in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Cerf is the third of four speakers in the series.

Christian Belady, general manager of Datacenter Services for Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services and a UT Dallas alumnus, spoke Feb. 26. Robert Edsel, writer of the acclaimed book The Monuments Men, kicked off the lecture series to a sold-out audience on Jan. 22.

Get TicketsTickets are $15 for seats on the lower level of the lecture hall; $10 upper level tickets are sold out for Cerf’s lecture. A limited number of complimentary tickets are available for students, faculty and staff who register.

Parking

Guests should park in Parking Structure I.  A map can be found here.

Next in the Series

April 16: Mae Jemison, scientist and astronaut. Click here for tickets.

The fourth speaker will be Dr. Mae Jemison, a chemical engineer, scientist, physician, entrepreneur, teacher and astronaut. She will speak on April 16. Jemison graduated from Stanford University in 1977 and earned her medical degree from Cornell Medical College (now Weill Medical College of Cornell University) in 1981. Jemison, who flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor in 1992, is multilingual and trained in dance and choreography. Jemison is an advocate for science education.

Tickets are on sale now for both remaining lectures. They are $15 for seats on the lower level of the Edith O’Donnell ATEC Building’s lecture hall and $10 for the upper level ($10 tickets are sold out for the Cerf lecture). A limited number of complimentary tickets are available for students, faculty and staff who register.

The lecture series, presented by The Dallas Morning News, was first announced during the recent dedication of the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building. The new building houses programs that explore topics at the intersection of arts and technology.

Audience Research in the New Media Landscape: Current Assessment and Future Directions

The School of Arts and Humanities announces Angela M. Lee, MA Candidate for Assistant Professor in ATEC (EMAC) Ms. Lee will give a talk entitled Audience Research in the New Media Landscape: Current Assessment and Future Directions 

This presentation will introduce a number of theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of audiences in today’s high-choice media environment, addressing the following questions: Why should communication scholars care about audience research? What is the audience’s role in the new media landscape? Who is using what type of news and why? And why are people not consuming news? The presentation will conclude with recommendations on future directions for audience research.

 Tuesday, February 11 at 11 am in ATC 2.811

b15bf8a8316675285f15be73076cd20eAngela M. Lee is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Journalism at University of Texas at Austin. She received her M.A. from the Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, and B.A. from UCLA with Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude, College of Letters & Science Honor, and Departmental Honor in Communication Studies.

Angela has published in peer-reviewed journals such as Communication Research, Journalism Studies, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, and Digital Journalism, and her collaborative work has been featured on the Nieman Journalism Lab website, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Recently, Angela was interviewed by the Annett Strauss Institute for Civic Life for her collaboration with The Dallas Morning News, to which she offers empirical and analytical consultation on audience research.

Ms. Lee will meet with students at 4 pm on Monday, Feb. 10  in ATC 2.807.