ATEC helps brings experimental films to Nasher

Ultra-seeing image 

A unique series of films exploring the phenomenon of synesthesia and visual music will be screening at the Nasher Sculpture Center starting Sept. 11.

In a collaboration between ATEC and Light Cone, a French film organization that diffuses and preserves experimental cinema, the Ultra-seeing Film Series will feature monthly, hour-long sessions of major works selected from the archives of Light Cone’s collection. The exposition is spearheaded by Dr. Frank Dufour, professor in ATEC, and Emmanuel Lefrant, director of Light Cone with the support of the Cultural Service of the French Embassy in Houston.

The first screening will explore avant-garde cinema of the 1920s and ’30s, exploring movements from Dadism to Surrealism. The series will run until May, 2017.

Admission is free with RSVP. Register for the entire series or individual screenings at www.nashersculpturecenter.org/ultra-seeing.

 

Ultra-Seeing Film Fall Schedule:

Sunday, September 11 / 2 pm: Avant-Garde from the 1920s and 30s

RHYTHMUS 21 by Hans RICHTER (Germany) 1921-1923 / 16 mm / b&w/ silent / 3′ 19

SYMPHONIE DIAGONALE by Viking EGGELING (Germany) 1923-1924 / 16 mm / b&w/ silent / 6′ 40

LICHTSPIEL OPUS I by Walther RUTTMANN (Germany) 1921 / 16mm / color / sound / 11′

ANÉMIC CINÉMA by Marcel DUCHAMP (France) 1925-1926 / 16 mm / b&w/ sound / 7′ 05

DISQUE 957 by Germaine DULAC (France) 1928 / 16 mm or DVD / b&w/ silent / 6′ 00

KREISE by Oskar FISCHINGER (Germany) 1933-1934 / 16 mm / color / sound / 2′ 00

RHYTHM IN LIGHT by Mary Ellen BUTE (USA) 1934 / video / b&w/ sound / 5′ 00

KOMPOSITION IN BLAU by Oskar FISCHINGER (Germany) 1935 / 16 mm / color / sound / 4′ 00

COLOUR BOX by Len LYE (UK) 1935 / 16mm / color / sound / 4′

ALLEGRETTO by Oskar FISCHINGER (Germany) 1936-1943 / 16 mm / color / sound / 2′ 30

TARANTELLA by BUTE Mary Ellen & NEMETH Ted (USA) 1940 / video / color / sound / 4′ 51

 

Sunday, October 9 / 2 pm: Michèle and Patrick Bokanowski

L’ANGE (RESTORED VERSION) by Patrick BOKANOWSKI (France) 1982 / DCP or 35 mm / color / sound / 70′

With filmmaker Patrick Bokanoswki and Michele Bokanowski in attendance.

 

Sunday, November 13 / 2 pm: Structural Film

AXIOMATIC GRANULARITY by Paul SHARITS (USA) 1973 / 16 mm / color / sound / 20′

DRESDEN DYNAMO by Lis RHODES (UK) 1974 / 16 mm / color / sound / 5′

In confrontation with films by local artists.

 

Sunday, December 11 / 2 pm: Musical Paradigm

CONTRATHEMIS : COMPOSITION II by Dwinnell GRANT (USA) 1941 / 16 mm / color / silent / 3′ 00

COLOR SEQUENCE by Dwinnell GRANT (USA) 1943 / 16 mm / color / silent / 2′ 30

RYTHMES 76 by Jean-Michel BOUHOURS (France) 1977 / 16 mm / color / silent / 18′ 00

R by Yann BEAUVAIS (France) 1975-1991 / 16 mm / b&w/ silent / 3′ 00

BERLIN HORSE by Malcolm LE GRICE (UK) 1970 / 16 mm / color / sound / 9′ 00

In confrontation with films by local artists.

 

 

ATEC Professor’s Exhibition Named Best in Dallas

The Dallas Observer has selected DreamArchitectonics, an audio-video installation by ATEC professor Frank Dufour and new media artist Kristin Lee Dufour, as the best art exhibition of 2015.

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Best Art Exhibit

DreamArchitectonics at Dallas Contemporary

 

The installation was created by artistic duo Kristin Lee & Frank Dufour of Agence5970 an independent laboratory dedicated to conceptual art, using predominately sound, as well as image, exploring concepts emerging at the conjunction of perception and representation and of Time as a structural support of expression.

View the full artist statement on the Agence5970 website.

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Art History Institute’s Ad Astra Lecture Begins Spring Slate of Events

Two talks this week will kick off the spring semester’s arts events.

On Wednesday, Dr. Sean B. Carroll, vice president for science education of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, will chronicle the adventures of scientist Jacques Monod in a talk presented by UT Dallas’ Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History as part of the Ad Astra Lecture Series.

Sean B. Carroll will talk about scientist Jacques Monod on Wednesday in a lecture presented by the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at UT Dallas. Carroll wrote about Monod in his book Brave Genius: A Scientist, A Philosopher and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize. The lecture will be held at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Named after the Latin phrase ad astra, meaning “to the stars,” the lecture series hosts emerging and established practitioners from art, science and technology with a goal of expanding the world and practice of the discipline of art history.

Carroll, an award-winning scientist, writer, educator and film producer, described Monod’s emergence as a public figure and leading voice of science in the book Brave Genius: A Scientist, A Philosopher and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize.

Carroll’s other books include Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species, which was a finalist for the National Book Award for nonfiction; The Making of the Fittest; andEndless Forms Most Beautiful. He also wrote a regular feature, “Remarkable Creatures,” for The New York Times.

The lecture is at 7 p.m. in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art. Admission is free and open to the public.

On Thursday, UT Dallas will host a panel discussion with distinguished figures in contemporary art and art education.

The discussion, titled “Panel Discussion on The Art Effect: Translational Ecology of Contemporary Art,” comes in conjunction with the Loris Gréaud exhibition that opens Saturday at the Dallas Contemporary. The forum aims to achieve an “intellectual investigation of translation, postproduction and relations in the context of contemporary art.”

The discussion will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building main lobby.

The panelists are:

  • Nicolas Bourriaud, director of the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-arts in Paris, curator, art critic and theorist. Bourriaud was curator for contemporary art at the Tate Britain in London from 2007 to 2010.
  • Éric Mangion, director of the National Centre of Contemporary Art of the Villa Arson in Nice, France, since 2006.
  • Loris Gréaud, transdisciplinary artist based in Paris. Gréaud creates transformative experiences that challenge the senses and confront the viewer with otherworldly landscapes.
  • Frank Dufour (moderator) digital artist, director of graduate studies for the ATEC program
  • Justine Ludwig, senior curator, Dallas Contemporary
  • Noah Simblist, associate professor and chair of the Division of Art, Southern Methodist University
  • Charissa Terranova, associate professor of aesthetic studies, UT Dallas

The event, supported by the Cultural Service at the French Consulate in Houston, is free and open to the public.

ATEC Faculty Art Exhibition Among Best of 2014

Arts and Technology Professor Frank Dufour’s DREAMARCHITECTONICS exhibition at the Dallas Contemporary was named among the 10 Best Art Exhibitions of 2014.  The Best of Dallas® is presented annually by the Dallas Observer.

Dallas-Contemporary-DREAMARCHITECTONICS-e1413416045256

About DREAMARCHITECTONICS

Dr. Frank Dufour
Dr. Frank Dufour

DREAMARCHITECTONICS is an interactive audio-visual installation that aims to infuse into the space a state of reverie or meditation in order to explore the structure of dreams.  Entering this space, the participant is immersed in a sphere of controlled quietness created by aerial active noise-cancellation.

Within this space, a book offers extracts of poetic texts, evocative of dreams. When read aloud, the chosen text is analyzed according to the acoustic and temporal signature of the reader’s voice, thus controlling the visual and musical output.  The resulting audio-visual sequence is designed to reveal the structural connections among the images suggested by the text.

The tuning between the system and the participant forms a syntonic experience similar to the effort of the remembrance of dreams.  The work seeks to present this fragile and fugacious sensation of movements in images, sounds and meanings occurring in dreams and attempts to render perceivable the altered experience of Time, characteristic of the dream-state.

The video above has been remixed for online platforms and diffusion on stereophonic systems. This version does not fully render the spacial acoustic dimension of the original installation.

Panel Discussion on The Art Effect: Translational Ecology of Contemporary Art

Dallas ContemporaryIn conjunction with the Loris Gréaud exhibition at the Dallas Contemporary opening Jan. 17, The Arts & Technology program and The Center for Translation Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas are hosting a panel discussion with local and international distinguished figures in contemporary art and art education. The objective of this forum is the intellectual investigation of translation, postproduction and relations in the context of contemporary art.

The panel discussion will take place on Thursday, Jan. 15 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology building main lobby.

PANEL

Nicolas Bourriaud

Nicolas Bourriaud
Nicolas Bourriaud

Nicolas is currently Director of the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-arts in Paris, cu- rator, art critic and theorist. From 2007 to 2010, Bourriaud was curator for contemporary art at The Tate Britain in London, where he organized, Altermodern.

From 1999 to 2006, he was also curator of contemporary art and co-director of Palais de Tokyo. Commissioner of Biennales in Lyons, Moscow and Athens (2005-2011) Bourriaud has curated numerous exhibitions worldwide. He is the founder of the art journals Documents sur l’Art and Revue Perpendiculaire and is a published author whose essays Relational Aesthetics, Postproduc- tion and The Radicant have been translated into fifteen languages.

Éric Mangion

Éric Mangion
Éric Mangion

Eric Mangion has been Director of the National Centre of Contemporary Art of the Villa Arson in Nice, France since 2006, where he programmed an exhibition cycle conceived from ephemeral practices (sound, poetry or performance). From 1993 to 2005 he directed the FRAC Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur.

He is an active art critic writing for an array of venues, including Art Press, Mangion investigates the function of “disappearance” as an artistic gesture, whether it be a matter of concealment, covering up, destruction, theft, vandalism, or simply the disappearance of the artist, thus analyzing how disappearance accompanies theoretically and formally the creation of our time.

Loris Gréaud

Loris Gréaud
Loris Gréaud

Loris Gréaud is a transdisciplinary artist based in Paris, France. Gréaud creates transformative experiences that challenge the senses and confront the viewer with otherworldly landscapes. Gréaud is the first artist to use the entire space of the Palais de Tokyo for an exhibition titled, “Cellar Doors,” while concurrently showing performative works titled “[I]” in the Louvre and and in the Centre Pompidou.

ATEC Professor Exhibited by The Dallas Contemporary

DREAMARCHITECTONICS is an audio-visual work installed in an acoustically-controlled space that proposes an experience favorable to the state of reverie. Presented by ATEC Professor Frank Dufour and Lee Dufour of Agence 5970 at the Dallas Contemporary.dreamarch

DREAMARCHITECTONICS
An Interactive Audio-Visual Installation
by Frank + Lee Dufour of Agence 5970

Dallas Contemporary

EXHIBITION DATES
17 Oct – 21 Dec 2014

OPENING CELEBRATION

Friday, Oct. 17
7-9 pm
Artist Talk at 7.30 pm

Free and open to the public.

DREAMARCHITECTONICS is an interactive audio-visual installation that aims to infuse into the space a state of reverie or meditation in order to explore the structure of dreams.  Entering this space, the participant is immersed in a sphere of controlled quietness created by aerial active noise-cancellation.

Within this space, a book offers extracts of poetic texts, evocative of dreams. When read aloud, the chosen text is analyzed according to the acoustic and temporal signature of the reader’s voice, thus controlling the visual and musical output.  The resulting audio-visual sequence is designed to reveal the structural connections among the images suggested by the text.

The tuning between the system and the participant forms a syntonic experience similar to the effort of the remembrance of dreams.  The work seeks to present this fragile and fugacious sensation of movements in images, sounds and meanings occurring in dreams and attempts to render perceivable the altered experience of Time, characteristic of the dream-state.

Get Animated with ATEC Students and Faculty at the Perot Museum

The Perot Museum of Nature and Science  Social Science events provide a rare opportunity for guests ages 21 and up to experience everyday exhibits and exclusive programs in an adults-only atmosphere. So get ready to get hands on with an interactive exhibit on Friday, January 17.

From animal physiology to digital animation, there’s more to the science of motion than meets the eye. Join us for Social Science: Animated, where you’ll hear from Dr. Ed Lu, Chairman and CEO, B612 Foundation, and Former NASA Astronaut as he leads the charge to protect Earth from asteroid strikes. You’ll also get to try your hand at newly developed video games, learn a step or two from a hip-hop dance troupe, create your own zoetrope animated film, or speak your mind during a live dubbing session.

Check out the amazing video games created by Tiny Thumbs and UT Dallas Arts and Technology graduate students from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the museum lobby. Two members of the ATEC faculty will also present featured talks in the Hoglund Foundation Theater:,

Sounds of the Animal World
With Dr. Frank DuFour, Assistant Professor of Arts & Technology, University of Texas at Dallas
9:00 p.m.

 

Animation and Gaming
With Dr. Eric Farrar, Assistant Professor of Arts & Technology, University of Texas at Dallas
9:30 p.m.

 

View a complete list of activities and buy tickets on the Perot Museum website.

ATEC Professors to Present During Perot Social Sciences Series

Explore sound design behind musicscapes of the Perot Museum and the technical and creative process sonification of scientific data with Dr. Frank Dufour, Associate Director for Doctoral Program and Scot Gresham-Lancaster, Sound Design from ATEC at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Auditory Representations of Scientific Thinking with Dr. Frank Dufour and Scot Gresham-Lancaster
October 4, 9:30pm │ Level 1 The Hoglund Foundation Theater

Perot Social Science: Sound

Curious about the effect of sound on your brain? Find out at our next Social Science, a night for adults 21+ to play in the museum with signature cocktails, friends, or even bring a date. There is something for everyone on October 4, including experimental music, a live band, a silent disco, and even improv dance performances. Try mixing your own music, create an instrument, and meet our guest neuroscientist and musicians.

Read more on the Perot Museum Website.

 

ATEC Students Design Sound for New Perot Museum

When the Perot Museum of Nature and Science opens this weekend, the state-of-the-art facility will feature the work of Arts and Technology students from The University of Texas at Dallas.

Derrick Dugan (left) and Charles McCormick were among students in the digital music production course.

During the last year, a group of undergraduates created soundscapes for the museum, giving the students hands-on experience in the field of sound design.

“This is a typical project that comes out of ATEC in that it connects art, science and technology in a creative dialogue and also contributes to positioning the University as a pertinent partner with major cultural institutions in the Metroplex,” said Dr. Frank Dufour, a professor of sound design who led the digital music production course. “Students were given a wonderful opportunity to express themselves in a professional environment in which their creativity was welcome.”

Dr. Frank Dufour

The students worked closely with Dufour and Roxanne Minnish, a UT Dallas sound design instructor, composer and project manager, and with museum officials to refine their designs throughout the semester.

“Dr. Dufour was conceptual in the way he taught, but also practical and logical. He is inspiring as a teacher,” said Josh Casey, a senior who worked on the project. “He guided us and gave us advice and challenged students to think about what the soundscapes should really represent.”

Located north of downtown Dallas near Victory Park, the 180,000-square-foot museum features five floors of public space with 11 permanent exhibit halls, including a children’s museum and a hall designed to host traveling exhibitions. The museum opens to the public on Saturday, Dec. 1.

The digital music production class worked on sound designs for the 11 exhibit halls, which include the T. Boone Pickens Life Then and Now Hall, Being Human Hall, Discovering Life Hall, Rose Hall of Birds, Sports Hall and the Texas Instruments Engineering and Innovation Hall, among others.

The students worked together, collaborating on certain designs and critiquing each other’s projects throughout the semester.

Audio Samples

“At first, when people criticize your work you may be offended, but I learned to become grateful for criticism – I learned a lot about the creative process and how to collaborate and bring new ideas together,” Casey said.

Each design required specific sounds that would enhance the educational and artistic quality of the exhibit. For example, there are heartbeats for baselines in the Being Human Hall soundscape and sweeping notes that rise and fall – like a flight pattern – in the Rose Hall of Birds design.

“Collaborating with UT Dallas on this project is just one of the ways that the Perot Museum seeks to enhance the visitor experience through highly immersive exhibits that cater to diverse learning styles,” said Steve Hinkley, vice president of programs at the Museum. “The students’ work demonstrates not only their dedication to innovation, but is a testament to visitors that the intersection of art and science is all around us.”

New Courses, Faculty for Spring 2013

As the Arts and Technology program continues to grow, three new faculty will join the program in spring 2013. A variety of new courses will be offered. View the full listing of ATEC and EMAC courses on CourseBook.

New Courses

A variety of new courses will be offered at the undergraduate and graduate level.

ATEC 4370 Topics in ATEC: Visual Evidence
Maximilian Schich

Visual Evidence is a multidisciplinary course, where we will look at exemplary visualizations in the broadest sense – from classic artworks, such as Altdorfer’s Battle of Alexander, to the latest scientific plots and info-graphics. Besides analyzing visualizations much like art historians traditionally do with artworks, the course will also include some practical exercise in producing and criticizing visualizations, ideally based on examples from the student’s original focus of study.

Participants will acquire essential skills of critical seeing, enabling them to persuade with better visualizations by applying the principle of creative destruction in a cognitive way.

Integrating visualization and visual studies, the course will include introductory lectures, multidisciplinary guest speakers from ATEC and beyond, as well as collaborative projects and talks by the students.

Students from ATEC, EMAC as well as Arts and Humanities will bring in their specific skills and are encouraged to learn from each other. We will cross-fertilize literature work, critical seeing, as well as data science skills (such as acquisition, cleaning, analysis, and visualization). Programming and math skills are not necessary but very useful.

ATEC 6389 Ecology of Complex Networks
Maximilian Schich

The Ecology of Complex Networks is a fundamental phenomenon that permeates data across multiple disciplines. This course will provide an introduction to this multidisciplinary phenomenon with a (non-exclusive) focus on the arts, humanities and culture. The course will provide an overview of the emerging state of the field and it’s connections to other relevant areas, such as biology, computer science, economics, engineering, math, physics, social science, technology, and others.
Participants will acquire a basic understanding of complex network phenomena in a variety of fields, including what is currently known as data science and digital humanities.

In addition to introductory lectures and multidisciplinary guest speakers from ATEC and beyond, students will form small teams to analyze, visualize and interpret complex network data. Students from ATEC, EMACS as well as Arts & Humanities will bring in their specific skills and are encouraged to collaborate and learn from each other. We will cross-fertilize literature work, critical seeing, as well as data skills (such as acquisition, cleaning, analysis, and visualization). Basic to advanced skills in programming, statistics and math are not a requirement but very useful. Requires permission of instructor.

ATEC 6389 Virtual Analog Computing
Paul Fishwick

How would you represent computer data (big and small), equations, and code if you were told to build rather than to write software? This is the question we will explore in this seminar. Most computing has been analog until fairly recently, and our representations of software artifacts has been limited by cost of deployment.

A Petri net machine encoded in the game of Minecraft

While our computers are digital, we are analog. Recent research in neuroscience and embodied cognition indicates that we “simulate” when we read and think. This suggests a new approach to software design where we evolve new embodied media to design and build software. This media includes 3D games, mixed reality, physical computing, and 3D printing. The idea is to explore new machines in virtual spaces, and to re- envision “software” by making it analog, more accessible, and engaging, for a wide audience.

The course will involve instructor lectures, invited lectures, student talks and projects. Both ATEC and Engineering (especially Computer Science) students are encouraged to take the class. The main prerequisites are a knowledge of at least one programming language, and an interest in arts-based design.

More information about this course

ATEC 6389 Translation of Spaces and Time
Frank Dufour and Rainer Schulte

The conceptual frame of the seminar will be based on the paradigm of translation. Together with the students, the instructors plan to build the vocabulary necessary to perform complex descriptions and analyses of representations of space and time in films, poems, music, novels, plays, and interactive narratives. George Steiner’s statement that all acts of interpretation and communication are acts of translation can serve as an entrance into the study of time and space.

By its very nature, translation establishes dynamic interactions from texts to texts and cultures to cultures. Thus, students will be able to identify and describe specific aspects of representations of space and time as they relate to cultural and artistic contexts. Furthermore, the instructors will make students aware of the existence of digital tools and techniques specially designed for the analysis of textual and multimedia contents. In addition, students will gain experience in the use of such tools to build models for the recording of the representation of time and space in literature, film, music, and theater. The seminar should be of particular interest to students in arts and technology, aesthetic studies, arts and performance, and world literature.

The ultimate goal of the seminar will be the work toward recommendations for digital software that would facilitate the dynamic representations of time and space in multimedia environments.

New Faculty

Three new faculty members will be joining Arts and Technology in spring 2013: Paul Fischwick, Maximilian Schich and Scott Swearingen.

Paul Fishwick
Distinguished Endowed Chair of Arts and Technology and Professor of Computer Science

Paul FischwickPaul Fishwick is joining the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) in January 2013. He will be Distinguished Endowed Chair of Arts and Technology (ATEC) and Professor of Computer Science. Paul has six years of industry experience as a systems analyst working at Newport News Shipbuilding and at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia.

He has been on the faculty at the University of Florida since 1986, and is Director of the Digital Arts and Sciences Programs there. His PhD was in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania. Fishwick is active in modeling and simulation, as well as in the bridge areas spanning art, science, and engineering. He pioneered the area of aesthetic computing, resulting in an MIT Press edited volume in 2006.

He is a Fellow of the Society for Computer Simulation, served as General Chair of the Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), was a WSC Titan Speaker in 2009, and has delivered over fifteen keynote addresses at international conferences. He is Chair of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group in Simulation (SIGSIM). Fishwick has over 200 technical papers and has served on all major archival journal editorial boards related to simulation, including ACM Transactions on Modeling and Simulation (TOMACS) where he was a founding area editor of modeling methodology in 1990.

Maximilian Schich
Associate Professor

Maximilian SchichDr. Maximilian Schich is an art historian, joining The University of Texas at Dallas as an Associate Professor for Art and Technology in January 2013. He works to converge hermeneutics, information visualization, computer science, and physics to understand art, history, and culture.

Recently, Maximilian worked on complex networks in the arts and humanities with Dirk Helbing, FuturICT coordinator at ETH Zurich (2012), and Albert-László Barabási, complex network physicist at Northeastern University in Boston (2008-2012). He was a DFG Research Fellow (2009-2012) and received funding from the Special Innovation Fund of the President of Max-Planck-Society (2008).

Previously, Max obtained his PhD in Art History from Humboldt-University in Berlin (2007), and his MA in Art History, Classic Archaeology, and Psychology from Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (2001). Besides, he looks back at over a decade of consulting experience, working with (graph) data in libraries, museums, and large research projects (1996-2008).

Maximilian is the organizing chair of the ongoing NetSci symposia series on Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks, as well as an Editorial Advisor at Leonardo Journal (MIT-Press). He publishes in multiple disciplines and is a prolific speaker, translating his ideas to diverse audiences across academia and industry.

Teaching at UT Dallas, Maximilian Schich aims to raise visual literacy (Visual Evidence) and provide students with a multidisciplinary perspective (Ecology of Complex Networks in Arts, Culture, and Beyond). Both aspects count on Art and Technology as key ingredients to further our understanding of our increasingly complex world.

Scott Swearingen
Associate Professor

Scott Swearingen is an artist, developer, and educator who creates interactive multimedia spaces that blur the boundaries between the virtual and practical. He has been working at the intersection of art and technology for nearly 20 years specializing in the categories of digital imaging, kinetic sculpture, video games, and virtual environments.

His work has been widely published and has garnered recognition from the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences as well as the Game Developers Choice Awards. He has collaborated on several award-winning franchises including Medal of HonorThe SimpsonsDead Space and The Sims.

As a professional designer, Scott is responsible for deploying game systems, prototyping mechanics, and crafting the overall user experience. He has partnered with and been featured by such notable companies as CompuServe, Electronic Arts, and MAXIS.

Scott has also instructed on Game Design and Virtual Environments at The University of Texas at Dallas as an Assistant Professor. Since then, many of his former students have gone to excel in academia and at various industry studios including iD Software, Gearbox Software, and DreamWorks Animation SKG.

His personal interests bridge installation art with short-form game design. While Scott’s early work embodied this in spaces contextually bound to themes of navigation, his art is becoming increasingly haptic-driven in concept.